Running Cool Blog

Electrolytes and the Performance Horse: Part 2

Cameron Jensen - Thursday, November 30, 2017

The heat is on! During Summer, extremes in temperature and humidity can be harmful to horses. For performance horses in particular, a demanding training and competition regime can result in rapid water and electrolyte loss. 

In this new series, we discuss the essential electrolytes that power performance and the steps you can take to reduce the risk of dehydration, heat stress and heat exhaustion.

What are electrolytes?

Electrolytes are electrically charged minerals that are imperative for heathy bodily function.

Of the electrolytes found in horse sweat, sodium, chloride, potassium, calcium and magnesium are the most well known. However, following intense exercise, a number of other important trace minerals may also be lost, including phosphorus, manganese and copper.

While many horse owners understand that lost electrolytes must be replaced, it’s important to also understand the role of each major electrolyte within the body.

In Summer, electrolyte loss is only worsened by high heat and humidity. As such, rehydration will be paramount in protecting your horse’s health, wellbeing and performance this season.

In Part 1, we began with sodium and chloride. Let’s continue with potassium.

Potassium

Like sodium and chloride, potassium will be lost at a faster rate, as a result of sweating, than the electrolytes calcium and magnesium.

Inside the body, potassium regulates the sensitivity of nerves and muscles, including both skeletal and heart muscles, to ensure they contract normally.

This is achieved by maintaining a near constant balance between potassium and sodium. As such, understanding the importance of potassium also means understanding its interaction with sodium.

Together, the major electrolytes potassium and sodium are crucial to athletic performance.

Replenishing potassium loss

The challenge with potassium is not so much about replenishing lost potassium, but ensuring potassium levels remain in the normal range.

In fact, the dangers associated with excess potassium are more important for discussion here when considering feeding electrolytes.

There are a number of common horse feeds that contain high levels of potassium, including:

  • Molasses
  • Lucerne hay
  • Herbs, such as garlic
  • High protein horse feeds may contain high potassium
  • Some horse supplements may contain high potassium

When determining your horse’s requirement for potassium, it’s critical that you evaluate their diet.

In Australia, pasture and hay is often sufficient in potassium. For many horses consuming a forage-first diet that provides 2% of their bodyweight in pasture and hay per day, they may not require supplemental potassium, unless intensive exercise exceeds two hours or more.

The key consideration when supplementing potassium in the form of electrolytes is maintaining a careful balance with sodium. While potassium is often reduced in horses stressed by heat, low blood potassium is best remedied by increasing sodium levels.

For two extra tips on adding sodium in the diet, click here.

Following intense exercise, an electrolyte replacer can be given to your horse to rebalance any deficiencies in potassium. However, at all times, ensure your horse also has access to fresh, clean drinking water.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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Electrolytes and the Performance Horse: Part 1

Cameron Jensen - Monday, November 20, 2017

The heat is on! During Summer, extremes in temperature and humidity can be harmful to horses. For performance horses in particular, a demanding training and competition regime can result in rapid water and electrolyte loss. 

In this new series, we discuss the essential electrolytes that power performance and the steps you can take to reduce the risk of dehydration, heat stress and heat exhaustion.

What are electrolytes?

Electrolytes are electrically charged minerals that are imperative for heathy bodily function.

Of the electrolytes found in horse sweat, sodium, chloride, potassium, calcium and magnesium are the most well known. However, following intense exercise, a number of other important trace minerals may also be lost, including phosphorus, manganese and copper.

While many horse owners understand that lost electrolytes must be replaced, it’s important to also understand the role of each major electrolyte within the body.

In Summer, electrolyte loss is only worsened by high heat and humidity. As such, rehydration will be paramount in protecting your horse’s health, wellbeing and performance this season.

Let’s begin with sodium and chloride.

Sodium and chloride

Sodium and chloride - the two components of salt - are easily lost in sweat. Along with potassium, horses will lose a higher percentage of sodium and chloride, as a result of sweating, than calcium and magnesium.

Within the horse’s body, sodium and chloride are imperative for hydration. Without them, your horse is at increased risk of dehydration, impaction, colic and tying up. However, insufficient sodium and chloride also affect:

  • Weight
  • Body pH
  • Hormone balance
  • Blood sugar regulation
  • The transmission of glucose
  • Nerve and musculoskeletal function
  • Hoof and coat health

For an animal that’s 60% water, the importance of sodium and chloride can’t be underestimated. In a 450kg horse, that’s a whopping 270kg of water!

Replenishing sodium and chloride loss

The average horse requires approximately two teaspoons of salt per day. It’s important that you consult your veterinarian or a qualified equine nutritionist to determine how much salt your performance horse requires. However, adding extra salt to their diet is a good place to start.

This is done best in two ways, including:

  1. Add two teaspoons of salt to your horse’s feed once per day to ensure your horse is receiving adequate salt.
  2. Provide a salt block in their paddock or stall to allow your horse to voluntarily seek out sodium and chloride.

Following intense exercise, an electrolyte replacer can be given to your horse to rebalance any deficiencies in sodium and chloride. However, at all times, ensure your horse also has access to fresh, clean drinking water.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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The Benefits of Slow Feeding Horses in Spring

Cameron Jensen - Monday, September 04, 2017

In many parts of Queensland, it feels like Spring has already arrived. A forage-first diet is essential for your horse’s health, wellbeing and performance. In this article, we discuss the benefits of slow feeding.

At the start of Spring, many horse owners take caution when returning their horses to pasture. For horses at risk of pasture-induced health problems, slow feeding is immensely important. However, slow feeding provides many positives to all horses, including those in work.

1. Healthy digestion

Above all, slow feeding promotes healthy digestion. In nature, horses graze up to 18 hours per day, promoting digestion and movement. Slow feeding allows horse owners to replicate this natural environment. This Spring, place slow feeding hay nets in multiple locations around the paddock.

2. Reduced stress

Your horse’s natural grazing behaviours are also important for their mental wellbeing. Limiting any horse’s feed intake to one small meal a day promotes the release of cortisol — the stress hormone. Instead, slow feeding hay nets ensure forage is available at all times.

3. Weight management

Under no circumstances should food be withheld from horses. Even overweight horses must receive 1.5-2.5% of their bodyweight in low-NSC hay per day. Slow feeding has been shown to lower cortisol, stimulate metabolism and regulate insulin — for a healthier bodyweight.

4. Lowered risk of ulcers

Within just six hours of food deprivation, ulcers begin to form inside a horse’s stomach. Saliva buffers the stomach acid your horse produces 24 hours a day. By using slow feeding hay nets, your horse continuously chews, in turn, helping to prevent the formation of stomach ulcers.

5. Dental health

When you picture a horse grazing, what do you see? Slow feeding at ground level allows your horse to wear their teeth evenly and maintain their natural grazing position — a lowered head and neck, allowing maximum jaw movement.

6. Positive experience

As prey animals, horses prefer to eat outside in unrestricted environments. Otherwise, their peripheral vision is impaired. Slow feeding hay nets should be placed in open areas, so your horse will feel safe, confident and secure when eating.

7. Herd harmony

Horses benefit physically and psychologically when kept in herds. However, meal times can often encourage dominant behaviours. When spaced apart, slow feeding hay nets allow all members of your herd to eat together.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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10 Ways to Protect Your Horse From Laminitis This Spring

Cameron Jensen - Monday, August 28, 2017

The arrival of Spring often strikes fear in the hearts of horse owners — and for good reason. A diagnosis of laminitis is devastating. Often, by the time a diagnosis is made, the hoof disease has already taken hold and management becomes a lifelong task. 

With the arrival of Spring just weeks away, we turn our attention to those horses most at risk. There’s much you can do this season to protect them. We share our top 10 tips.

Tip 1: Restrict high-energy Concentrate

Your horse’s diet should be designed specifically for their workload. Avoid overloading them with excess commercial horse feed by providing only the daily rations they need, matched to their caloric requirements for energy.

Tip 2: Remove sugars, add fats

If your horse is losing weight unexpectedly or their workload is set to increase with the start of Spring, give them energy with fats, not sugars. Fats in the form of oils can be safely added to your horse’s daily feed rations when additional calories are needed.

Tip 3: Store horse feed securely

If any horse has unrestricted access to commercial horse feeds, the consequences can be deadly. All horse feed should be stored in closed containers within a closed feed room that cannot be accessed easily by roaming horses.

Tip 4: Only make dietary changes gradually

When changing hays and commercial horse feeds, dietary changes must be made with care. Click here to learn more. However, if your horse is already fed Running Cool, feeds can be swapped without the need for a gradual approach.

Tip 5: Limit access to fresh Spring grass

Young, growing grass which appears in early Spring and following drought must be approached with caution. If your horse’s Winter diet has comprised mostly hay, allow them to graze for 15 minutes of grazing per day in the mornings, then increase steadily. Click here to learn more.

Tip 6: Test hay for starch and sugar

Just like pasture, hay may also contain high levels of non-structural carbohydrates (NCSs), including starch and sugar, that are responsible for pasture-induced, or endocrinopathic, laminitis. When changing hay sources, test a sample if your horse is particularly at risk.

Tip 7: Remain vigilant with preventive healthcare

Prevention is, by far, better than cure and this isn’t more true than in cases of laminitis. Regular de-worming, vaccinations and veterinary checks are paramount to protecting your horse from this potentially fatal disease.

Tip 8: Regularly trim and balance the hooves

Healthy hooves are a must when avoiding laminitis. Regardless of whether your horse is kept shod or barefoot, regularly trimming every 6-8 weeks will help to ensure their hooves remain healthy and any problems are detected early.

Tip 9: Support both hooves during lameness

If lameness arises at any time, both hooves must be supported. In many cases where the unaffected hoof is left unsupported, mechanical laminitis can occur as a result. Instead, both hooves should be considered.

Tip 10: Avoid hard ground when training or exercising

Excessive concussion can have adverse affects on your horse’s hooves. Particularly when cantering or galloping, riding over hard ground should be kept to an absolute minimum — if not avoided altogether.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

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How to Safely Transition Your Horse to Spring Pasture

Cameron Jensen - Monday, August 14, 2017

As Winter becomes Spring, the transition to Spring pasture must be managed with care. A gradual approach not only protects the health of your horses, but also promotes the health of your pastures — saving you energy, time and money. 

Healthy horses

Your horse’s digestive system is designed to process fibre, including hay and pasture. However, there are vast differences between these two fibrous feed sources, including moisture content. While hay is comprised of approximately 15% moisture, pasture usually holds 85% moisture.

Being a hindgut fermenting herbivore, rapid changes from hay to pasture can wreak havoc on microbial populations in the digestive system — often leading to toxin absorption, digestive upset and even colic. Instead, gradual dietary changes give microbial populations time to adjust.

Healthy pastures

A slow introduction to Spring pasture takes into account your pasture’s growth phase. At 7-10cm, grazing can radically diminish photosynthesis, leaving plants depleted and with only shallow root structures; in turn, allowing harmful plant species, such as weeds, to take hold.

Pastures should only be grazed when above 15-20cm in height. When pastures reduce to 7-10cm, grazing must cease to prevent over-grazing. While you wait for pasture to grow, your horse can be moved to another pasture or given continuous free-choice hay on a dry lot.

Spring grazing strategy

To protect the health of your horses and your pastures, there are some simple steps you can follow this Spring.

  1. When the grass reaches 15-20cm in height, allow your horse to graze for 15 minutes per day, preferably in the morning when non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) content is lowest.
  1. As your horse is introduced to Spring pasture, continue to feed them their normal hay diet. A forage-first diet, supported by a well-balanced concentrate, such as Running Cool, is imperative for every horse, regardless of age, breed, use and workload.
  1. Gradually increase grazing time by 15 minutes each day, until your horse is grazing for 4-5 hours consecutively. By then, your horse can graze unrestricted.

Spring grass and health problems

However, caution must be taken for any horse pre-disposed or currently suffering from equine metabolic syndrome, laminitis or cushing’s disease. For these horses, pasture intake may need to remain minimal or be avoided altogether.

If you suspect your horse is at risk of any of these conditions, consult your veterinarian for their feeding recommendations.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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From Winter to Spring: 4 Tips for Feeding Your Horse

Cameron Jensen - Tuesday, August 08, 2017

As Winter becomes Spring, new nutrition challenges arise. But, with some forethought and planning this month, you can protect your horse’s health. In this article, we share four important tips when feeding your horse from Winter to Spring.

Tip 1: Manage pasture intake

The arrival of Spring is a particular concern for the insulin-resistant or laminitic horse, as grass growth is dramatically higher in fructans and water-soluble carbohydrates. However, even if your horse doesn’t require a dry lot or grazing muzzle, there are steps every horse owner should take.

For horses without access to pasture during Winter, the transition to grazing should be done slowly. If grass growth poses a risk on your property, horses should only be allowed to graze for short periods in the morning over the coming weeks.

Tip 2: Monitor body condition

During Winter, temperature and workload can effect horses differently. While some horses gain weight over Winter due to lack of exercise, other horses lose weight keeping warm. Before jumping into your horse’s Spring diet, you must first assess body condition.

When evaluating your horse’s body condition, it’s always best to seek the advice of your veterinarian or a qualified equine nutritionist. Only with an unbiased and accurate condition score can you make the necessary changes to increase or decrease your horse’s caloric intake safely.

Tip 3: Consider quality concentrates

At the start of Spring, many horse owners are eager to bring their horses back into work. If your horse’s workload increases, their energy requirements also go up. A quality horse feed, such as Running Cool, will provide them with the essential protein, vitamins and minerals they need.

However, care must be taken when choosing the right horse feed for your horse. A qualified equine nutritionist will help you assess workload and body condition to ensure you select a well-balanced horse feed that will maintain ideal body condition.

Tip 4: Protect against dehydration

As the weather warms, hydration must remain a top priority. Every horse should have unlimited access to fresh, clean drinking water, and be offered additional water following exercise and transport. Your water sources should also be checked regularly for signs of contamination.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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The Role of Nutrition on Horse Behaviour: Part 3

Cameron Jensen - Monday, July 31, 2017

 

Creating a diet for your horse begins by assessing their age, breed, workload and overall health. But, what about when your horse’s feed ration is unbalanced, leading to unexpected and unwanted behaviours?

In our new series on the role of nutrition on horse behaviour, we explore this further…

Every horse is an individual and your horse’s diet should be specifically formulated for them. It’s important you continue to pay attention to their nutrition throughout life as their caloric needs may change — at different times of year, when their workload increases and as they age.

Encountering unexpected — and certainly unwanted — behaviours can be challenging. While some behaviours are mild, such as difficulty when tacking up, other behaviours can be downright dangerous, like rearing, bucking and spooking under saddle.

As a horse owner, it’s important you don’t jump to any conclusions too quickly. Your horse isn’t necessarily trying to be “stubborn” or “nasty”; in fact, they’re often trying to tell you an important message — and it’s up to each of us to listen.

Remember, unexpected behaviours can be linked to a number of causes. Before making any changes to your horse’s diet, you should have them assessed by your veterinarian to ensure pain or an underlying health problem isn’t the cause.

If these possibilities have already been eliminated, it’s time to consider their diet.

Diet and Feed Management

In Part 1 and 2 of our series, we recommended simple dietary changes you can make for your horse when you consider their age and workload. A forage-first diet, high in fibre, low in sugar, is fundamental for health, wellbeing and performance — and good behaviour.

But, what if your feed ration is correct and your feed management is wrong? There are a number of common mistakes horse owners make at feed time, particularly when feeding performance horses whose diets demand higher energy. These include:

  • Providing too much feed in one sitting. It’s imperative that each serving of feed doesn’t exceed 2kg. Ideally, your horse should receive the full ration across two or more meals per day to ensure their digestive tract isn’t overloaded all at once.
  • Focusing on grain and concentrate, without providing enough forage. Fibre is the most important ingredient in your horse’s diet. Without adequate forage, including pasture and hay, undigested starch from grain and concentrate disrupts the normal fermentation process.

Together, these feeding mistakes can lead to irritation, inflammation and pain in the hindgut — sometimes exhibited as mild colic signs. However, other problems can occur, including unwanted behaviours, such as:

  • Unwillingness to work
  • Loss of appetite
  • Chewing of fences or other surfaces

However, when the right type and amount of feed is given, your horse’s health, wellbeing and performance benefit. If you still have questions about your horse’s diet, speak with a qualified equine veterinarian or nutritionist. To learn more about our Running Cool range, please call (07) 4666 3366 or visit www.runningcool.com.au.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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The Role of Nutrition on Horse Behaviour: Part 2

Cameron Jensen - Monday, July 24, 2017

 

Creating a diet for your horse begins by assessing their age, breed, workload and overall health. But, what about when your horse’s feed ration is unbalanced, leading to unexpected and unwanted behaviours?

In our new series on the role of nutrition on horse behaviour, we explore this further…

Every horse is an individual and your horse’s diet should be specifically formulated for them. It’s important you continue to pay attention to their nutrition throughout life as their caloric needs may change — at different times of year, when their workload increases and as they age.

Encountering unexpected — and certainly unwanted — behaviours can be challenging. While some behaviours are mild, such as difficulty when tacking up, other behaviours can be downright dangerous, like rearing, bucking and spooking under saddle.

As a horse owner, it’s important you don’t jump to any conclusions too quickly. Your horse isn’t necessarily trying to be “stubborn” or “nasty”; in fact, they’re often trying to tell you an important message — and it’s up to each of us to listen.

Remember, unexpected behaviours can be linked to a number of causes. Before making any changes to your horse’s diet, you should have them assessed by your veterinarian to ensure pain or an underlying health problem isn’t the cause.

If these possibilities have already been eliminated, it’s time to consider their diet.

Diet and Age

As your horse ages, you’ll need to re-consider their dietary needs. But, for now, let’s turn our attention to the young, nervous horse. These horses in their early stages of training are often mild and obedient at home, but in new environments become increasingly anxious.

For most young horses, they’ll develop confidence over time as they continue encountering novel experiences. But, with some simple dietary changes, life can become much simpler — and set your young horse up for lifelong health.

A study conducted by Dr Jan Bowman at Montana State University studied 12 young Quarter Horses at the beginning of training. Each horse was trained five days a week; one group received a hay-only diet (grass/alfalfa), while the other also received two kilograms of sweet feed per day.

During training, each horse wore a pedometer and heart rate monitor, so they could be easily scored for obedience and separation anxiety. As you may expect, the results linked high levels of sugar to nervous behaviours.

In contrast to the horses on a hay-only diet, the horses given sweet feed were:

  • Livelier
  • Less obedient
  • More resistant to being saddled
  • More inclined to buck and run
  • More anxious when separated
  • More inclined to vocalise

By reducing the amount of sugar in your horse’s diet, you will notice positive changes in behaviour. A forage-first diet, high in fibre, is ideal for every horse, regardless of their age. For those in training or competition, energy should be supplied in the form of fat and fibre, instead of grain.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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The Role of Nutrition on Horse Behaviour: Part 1

Cameron Jensen - Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Creating a diet for your horse begins by assessing their age, breed, workload and overall health. But, what about when your horse’s feed ration is unbalanced, leading to unexpected and unwanted behaviours? 

In our new series on the role of nutrition on horse behaviour, we explore this further…

Every horse is an individual and your horse’s diet should be specifically formulated for them. It’s important you continue to pay attention to their nutrition throughout life as their caloric needs may change - at different times of year, when their workload increases and as they age.

Encountering unexpected - and certainly unwanted - behaviours can be challenging. While some behaviours are mild, such as difficulty when tacking up, other behaviours can be downright dangerous, like rearing, bucking and spooking under saddle.

As a horse owner, it’s important you don’t jump to any conclusions too quickly. Your horse isn’t necessarily trying to be “stubborn” or “nasty”; in fact, they’re often trying to tell you an important message - and it’s up to each of us to listen.

Remember, unexpected behaviours can be linked to a number of causes. Before making any changes to your horse’s diet, you should have them assessed by your veterinarian to ensure pain or an underlying health problem isn’t the cause.

If these possibilities have already been eliminated, it’s time to consider their diet.

Diet and Workload

The purpose of your horse’s diet is to supply them with the energy and nutrients they need. When considering your horse’s caloric requirements, you must first evaluate their workload. As your horse’s workload increases from light, to moderate, to strenuous, they’ll require more energy.

However, there are two common reasons for unexpected behaviours that can be linked to diet and workload. These are:

  • Providing your horse with too much energy for their workload
  • Providing your horse with energy from carbohydrates, instead of fibre

A study conducted by Dr Nell Davidson et al. entitled ‘The effects of diet and exercise on the behaviour of stabled horses’ compared the behaviour of two groups of horses, maintained on different diets (forage/grain vs forage) and exercise regimes (light vs strenuous).

It should come as no surprise the horses given the forage/grain diet and only light exercise demonstrated the highest levels of restless behaviours when stabled and the highest levels of uncooperative behaviours when handled.

Quite simply, these horses were fed more calories than they utilised. If your horse is on a light exercise regime, they should be given a forage-first diet, high in fibre, supported by a balanced concentrate to ensure they receive the right blend of vitamins and minerals.

For those horses on a moderate to strenuous exercise regime, grain should be replaced with fat and fibre in their forage-first diet. Horses should also be given the opportunity to exercise and socialise with others. Keeping them at pasture supports both health and wellbeing.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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2 Steps for Feeding the Performance Horse

Cameron Jensen - Tuesday, July 04, 2017

The goal of any nutritional program is to provide a performance horse with a well-balanced diet that protects their health and supports them to reach their full athletic potential. In this article, we share the two steps for feeding your performance horse. 

It’s important to remember that nutrition doesn’t have to be complex. There are seven fundamental ingredients that every horse needs in their diet, regardless of their workload. These include:

  • Vitamins
  • Minerals
  • Fibre
  • Fats
  • Protein
  • Carbohydrates
  • Water

Step 1: A Well-Balanced Diet

For the performance horse — just like the pleasure horse — a diet is only truly well-balanced if it contains all of these ingredients. So, let’s explore these further:

  • Vitamins and Minerals: Vitamins and minerals have been grouped together to emphasise both are fundamental ingredients for sustaining performance. Without sufficient vitamins and minerals, even small deficiencies can limit your horse’s athletic potential. To learn more, click here.
  • Fibre: Fibre is arguably the most important ingredient in any horse’s diet. Every horse should receive a forage-first diet that is comprised primarily of roughage sources to assist in preventing dehydration, colic, gastric ulcers, behavioural problems, and more. To learn more, click here.
  • Fats: Fats, usually given in oil form, improve body condition, without promoting hot, fizzy behaviours typically associated with high-grain diets. Unsaturated fats, such as rice bran oil, provide your performance horse with readily digestible energy. To learn more, click here.
  • Protein: The amino acids that make up protein are the building blocks of your performance horse’s muscles, skin, hair and hooves. When supplied in the diet, high quality protein repairs tissue and maintains healthy coat and hoof condition. To learn more, click here.
  • Carbohydrates: Every performance horse requires energy, and both structural and non-structural carbohydrates play a role. In short, fibrous sources provide slow-release energy, while sugars and starches provide rapid-release energy. To learn more, click here.
  • Water: The importance of water cannot be overestimated. Every horse must have continuous access to fresh, cleaning drinking water to remain hydrated, including in Winter.

Step 2: Feeding Strategies for Performance

Throughout the day, your performance horse should have unlimited access to free-choice roughage, such as hay or pasture. When adding commercial horse feeds, such as Running Cool, you should consider their workload.

  • For performance horses in high intensity/short duration sports, their forage-first diet should be supported by carbohydrates for energy and protein for muscle repair, recovery and rebuilding.
  • For performance horses in low intensity/long duration sports, their forage-first diet should be supported by fats for improved body condition and fibre for slow-release energy.
  • For performance horses in moderate intensity/moderate duration sports, their forage-first diet will require a combination of carbohydrates, protein, fats and fibre, depending on the type of sport.

At Running Cool, we genuinely care about your horse’s health and wellbeing. Our superior horse feed range supports your horse at every stage of life with well-balanced vitamins, minerals and protein for pleasure and performance. Click here to learn more.

 

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